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Got the right rabbit housing?

02/12/2019 - Small Pets

Isle of Pets proudly support Rabbit Awareness Week every year. They have produced a great website, so where better to get advice about your bunnies' welfare.

For more usef
ul rabbit related information see https://www.rabbitawarenessweek.co.uk/ 

Rabbits Kept Outdoors 
You should always make sure your rabbits’ housing is protected from the elements and well away from any predators or loud noises that could scare them.

  • Your rabbits' housing should be as big as possible but at least 2 feet high, 2 feet wide and 6 feet long.
  • Housing should be permanently attached to a larger outdoor run within which your rabbits can exercise freely. The run area should be at least 3 feet high, 6 feet wide and 8 feet long so that your bunnies can run around as they would do in the wild.
  • Make sure your rabbits have a secure shelter with plenty of soft, safe bedding. Your rabbits will also need access to an area where they can go to the toilet; this should be separate to the sleeping areas and you can use newspaper, hay and/or a paper based non-expanding litter.
  • Your rabbits should also have safe places to hide when they are scared or don't feel like socialising. Good hiding spots include tubes and tunnels.
  • Rabbits are extremely playful so it’s important that you provide them with lots of rabbit safe toys to keep them occupied. You can buy rabbit safe toys from pet shops, but great, inexpensive options are willow balls and cardboard tubes.
  • Rabbits should have constant access to fresh clean water, that should be changed daily.
  • Nuggets are also an important part of a rabbit's diet and they should have access to a small bowl everyday. For accurate serving measurements, follow the feeding guide on the back of pack.
  • Hay is the most important part of a rabbit's diet, and they should have access to their body size in fresh hay everyday.

Did you know?

Rabbits have complex digestive systems. Food is passed through their gut and this is how caecotrophs are produced, rabbits then eat the caecotrophs and the food is re-ingested.

Rabbits Kept Indoors
You should make sure your rabbits’ housing is away from any predators or loud noises which could scare them, and any wires/sockets are covered or out of reach. Also, it is good to mix up your indoor rabbit’s environment by giving them access to an outdoor run during good weather. If this is not possible, provide fresh growing grass for them to graze on.

  • Your rabbits housing itself should be as big as possible but at least 2 feet high, 2 feet wide and 6 feet long.
  • Make sure your rabbits' have a secure shelter with plenty of soft, safe bedding. Also make sure that the housing is attached to a permanent run or larger space for them to exercise freely.
  • Your rabbits will also need access to an area where they can go to the toilet; this should be separate to the sleeping areas and you can use newspaper, hay/straw and/or a paper based non-expanding litter.
  • Rabbits are extremely playful so it’s important that you provide them with lots of rabbit safe toys to keep them occupied. You can buy rabbit safe toys from pet shops, but great, inexpensive options are willow balls and cardboard tubes.
  • Your rabbits should have safe places to hide when they are scared or don't feel like socialising. Good hiding spots include boxes and tunnels.
  • Rabbits love to dig, and indoor rabbits don't have the luxury of constant access to an outside area for them to dive into. A digging box can be provided very easily and cheaply, by putting soil mixed with straw inside a box.
  • Nuggets are also an important part of a rabbit's diet and they should have access to a small bowl everyday. For accurate serving measurements, follow the feeding guide on our diet page.
  • Rabbits should have constant access to fresh clean water, that should be changed daily.
  • Hay is the most important part of a rabbit's diet, and they should have access to their body size in fresh hay everyday.
  • Rabbits love to dig, and indoor rabbits don't have the luxury of constant access to an outside area for them to dive into. A digging box can be provided very easily and cheaply, by putting soil mixed with straw inside a box.

Did you know?

Rabbits require regular vaccinations and health checks.


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